Menu

Eco-Innovation icon Eco-Innovation and Eco-Efficiency icon Eco-Efficiency:
Gardner Denver Nash

Gardner Denver Nash is reporting in two categories. View the Eco-Innovation and Eco-Efficiency case studies.

icon Eco-Innovation
Designing for Enhanced Products

Key Environmental Performance Areas:

  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Products and Services)
  • Water Use (Products and Services)
  • Energy Use (Products and Services)

Five products feature technological advancements: The Hoffman & Lamson MAX Seal, Rigel Controls, and 900 Series; Nash Ener-Jet Hybrid Systems; and Eco-Flo.

The company’s goal is to develop products that consume less energy and water than existing products.

The Nash Ener-Jet Hybrid System reduces steam consumption by up to 15 percent.

Challenge

The industrial sector accounts for approximately half of global energy use and produces approximately 1.3 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.i,ii Manufacturers can help manage their energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions and costs by improving the efficiency of both their facilities and production processes.

Gardner Denver Nash (“Nash”), a subsidiary of Gardner Denver, provides a leading global service and technical support for Nash liquid ring vacuum pumps, compressors, and engineered systems, Hoffman & Lamson centrifugal blowers, and Oberdorfer pumps. From manufacturing facilities strategically located around the globe, Nash serves the chemical, oil & gas, power, paper, mining, environmental, food, wastewater treatment, and other industries. Nash develops and sells products that help its customers improve their efficiency and reduce their environmental impact.

Response

Five of Nash’s products feature technological advancements that improve the products’ use natural resources or energy.

Hoffman & Lamson MAX Seal

Nash’s Hoffman & Lamson MAX Seal is used for applications where toxic and explosive gases are present and used with multistage centrifugal blowers, such as the capture of landfill gas emissions. Applying its expertise related to this customer need, the company developed a dry running seal. Innovation in process seal technology led to enhanced product design and improvements in the product’s environmental footprint. Not only does the MAX Seal feature an upgraded design, but it also can be installed on site without replacing any major components of existing Hoffman & Lamson blowers. These product attributes lead to cost savings and reductions in raw material use.

image

Nash Rigel Controls

Rigel Controls are a software and hardware control system for multistage centrifugal blowers. By adding intelligence to the system, Rigel Controls enable automatic monitoring and control of blower operation, including speed control. This enables the blower to slow its rotational speed and output under lighter load conditions, which reduces energy consumption to the amount required by a wastewater treatment plant at any point in time.

image

image

Hoffman & Lamson 900 Series

Nash’s Hoffman & Lamson centrifugal blowers move a high flow rate of air or gas. They are used for applications such as aeration and gas boosting in industries including wastewater treatment, landfill gas, oil refining, power, and chemical plants. In 2014, Nash began research and development of multistage centrifugal blowers designed especially for operation in 50Hz countries. In 2015, Nash launched the Hoffman & Lamson 900 Series. This series, which is up to 8 percent more efficient compared to 60Hz models operating in 50Hz environments, delivers significant energy savings for Nash’s customers.

image

Nash Ener-Jet Hybrid Systems

Nash hybrid systems are an integrated system of steam ejectors, condensers, and liquid ring vacuum pumps. These systems are used to evacuate gases and vapors from vessels, most typically on vacuum crude towers in oil refineries and in geothermal power stations. Nash has designed and manufactured hybrid systems since 1979, and through research and development, modified the design to deliver up to a 15 percent reduction in steam consumption compared to earlier versions of the product.This not only reduces energy consumption, but also decreases greenhouse gas emissions.

image

Eco-Flo Technology

Through research and development, Nash recognized an opportunity to reduce water use on select liquid ring vacuum pumps through a modified design. The patented Nash Eco-Flo technology modifies the pump’s internal passageways, thereby reducing water use and lowering operating costs without affecting power or performance. The Eco-Flo design upgrade of Nash’s CL and 2BE3 pump models eliminates over-compression, improves handling of system upsets, and reduces stress on the drive system all while effectively cutting water use in half compared to earlier versions of the product.

image

Resultsiii

These five products enable Nash customers to achieve greater efficiency performance, while also allowing for a longer product life.

  • Hoffman & Lamson MAX Seal: The new seal design reduces fugitive emissions by up to 67 percent and eliminates bearing contamination from process gas. As the MAX Seal is dry running, no gas purge is required. Consequently, the MAX Seal bearing has a longer life, does not wear into the shaft, and results in less contamination of the lubricant.
  • Hoffman & Lamson Rigel Controls: This technology reduces energy use by 20 percent of energy use annually compared to inlet throttling and thus offers an accelerated payback on initial investment. In addition, the design utilizes the most current wireless communication protocols and hardware to minimize the amount of cabling and wiring. These added features reduce installation and maintenance costs while providing advanced diagnostics and precise system control.
  • Hoffman & Lamson 900 Series: The optimized design operates with a direct-coupled motor, which delivers up to 8 percent greater efficiency compared to the industry standard 60hz when operating with a gear box. Increased energy savings accelerate investment payback while offering the same high performance and level of durability that customers expect from the products. In addition to energy savings, with proper maintenance, the 900 Series may have a bearing life of 10 years or longer, which is an efficient use of resources. The 900 Series has been well received, particularly in Asia, where the company has sold more than 10 units totaling more than $2 million. Nash is now expanding this product line to introduce new models.
  • Nash Ener-Jet Hybrid Systems: Nash Ener-Jet hybrid systems reduce total energy consumption for the end user, as the liquid ring pump on the third stage of the system is more efficient than the steam ejector under the same conditions. Engineered for optimum efficiency, these systems now offer a 15 percent or greater reduction in steam consumption and associated energy use and costs. In a recent project evaluation, a customer in India selected a Nash Ener-Jet hybrid system because it reduced steam consumption by more than 25 percent as compared to a competitor’s offering.
  • Eco-Flo Technology: Nash estimates that customers who upgrade to the Eco-Flo technology can achieve payback within six months or less, as the Eco-Flo seal reduces water flow by up to 50 percent. With the new design, the inlet and discharge piping are unchanged, allowing the upgraded pumps to fit existing system designs. Revenue continues to grow for this aftermarket upgrade, as Nash has expanded this patented technology to a second product line.

Gardner Denver Nash began participating in the Eco-Innovation category of KKR's green program in 2015 and is communicating results for the second time.


i U.S. Energy Information Agency. How much energy is consumed in the world by each sector?" 7 January 2015. Web. 22 April 2016. http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=447&t=1%20.

ii Brueske, S., Sabouni, R., Zach, and Andres, H. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis. November 2012. Web. 21 April 2016. http://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/11/f4/energy_use_and_loss_and_emissions.pdf.

iii Self-reported portfolio company data is not calculated, reviewed or independently verified by KKR or KKR Capstone. For more information regarding the results methodology for companies evaluating their own data, please see the methodology section. There is no guarantee that any GSP-related avoided costs or added efficiencies will positively impact the portfolio company’s valuation or performance.

Unless otherwise noted, portfolio company data represents 2015 results, published in August 2016. These case studies may contain forward looking statements including descriptions of planned projects and projected results and savings. These statements are subject to the risk that the projects will not develop as planned or at all or that projected results and savings are not realized.

icon Eco-Efficiency
Boosting Facility Efficiency

Key Environmental Performance Area:

  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Facilities)

Completed energy efficiency guides and began to implement best practices at its participating facilities.

Upgraded air conditioning performance and implemented lighting improvements at select facilities.

Avoided more than $55,700 in costs due to efficiency improvements since 2013.

Challenge

The industrial sector accounts for approximately half of global energy use and produces approximately 1.3 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.i,ii Manufacturers can help manage their energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions and costs by improving the efficiency of their facilities and production processes.

Gardner Denver Nash (“Nash”), a subsidiary of Gardner Denver, provides industry leading global service and technical support for Nash liquid ring vacuum pumps, compressors, and engineered systems, Hoffman & Lamson centrifugal blowers, and Oberdorfer pumps. From manufacturing facilities strategically located around the globe, Nash serves the chemical, oil & gas, power, paper, mining, environmental, food, wastewater treatment, and other industries. Nash is improving and tracking the energy efficiency of its U.S.-based service facilities, as well as its Bentleyville manufacturing facility in Pennsylvania, U.S.

Response

In 2015, Nash continued measuring and managing energy consumption in its U.S.-based facilities against a 2013 performance baseline. The company addressed its energy efficiency performance by implementing a number of practices, including:

  • Developed energy efficiency playbooks with the help of an Environmental Defense Fund Climate Corps Fellow and began to implement practices described within these guides.
  • Implemented lighting improvements at two facilities.
  • Upgraded air conditioning performance at one facility.
  • Installed three high-volume, low-speed fans, which use half as much energy as traditional fans, at its Bentleyville facility.
  • Performed infrared testing on electrical equipment in Bentleyville as well as at other service centers across the country to identify possible safety and energy efficiency issues. The inspections of electrical equipment diagnosed hot spots that can cause equipment to run inefficiently or go into fault, helping to avoid safety problems or fires.
  • Integrated its Marine and R&D businesses from Connecticut, U.S., into a custom-built, 4,200 square foot annex to the Bentleyville facility. This annex incorporates energy efficient features, natural lighting, and T8 fluorescent lighting. Light colored paint was used for its reflective properties, and a heated makeup air unit has increased HVAC system efficiency by heating cold makeup air before it is introduced to the facility.

Resultsiii

Absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from these facilities decreased approximately 8 percent in 2015, compared with a 2013 baseline, while efficiency has improved approximately 10 percent (GHGs/$ revenue) during the same period. The efficiency improvements have helped Nash to avoid more than $55,700 in costs and approximately 250 metric tons of GHG emissions since 2013:

Facility GHG Efficiency (2013 Baseline)
Estimated Results 2014 2015 TOTAL
Avoided GHGs (metric tons) 100 140 250
Avoided costs $17,000 $38,600 $55,700

Gardner Denver Nash began participating in KKR's green program in 2015 and is communicating results as part of the eco-efficiency category for the second time.


i U.S. Energy Information Agency. "How much energy is consumed in the world by each sector?" 7 January 2015. Web. 22 April 2016. http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=447&t=1%20.

ii Brueske, S., Sabouni, R., Zach, and Andres, H. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis. November 2012. Web. 21 April 2016. http://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2013/11/f4/energy_use_and_loss_and_emissions.pdf.

iii Reported results are based upon data provided by the portfolio company, and have not been reviewed or independently verified by KKR or KKR Capstone. KKR may calculate the figures presented in an effort to ensure calculation methodologies are consistently applied across companies in the Eco-Efficiency category. For more information regarding KKR’s calculations, please see the methodology section. There is no guarantee that any GSP-related avoided costs or added efficiencies will positively impact the portfolio company’s valuation or performance.

Unless otherwise noted, portfolio company data represents 2015 results, published in August 2016. These case studies may contain forward looking statements including descriptions of planned projects and projected results and savings. These statements are subject to the risk that the projects will not develop as planned or at all or that projected results and savings are not realized.